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Pri¢ing

(defining)

Terms

You've probably seen many phrases being thrown out there interchangeably. Many of them don't seem super obvious. Let's use the information below to understand these terms better.

user pricing

cordon pricing

transport pricing

mobility pricing

road pricing

congestion pricing

network  pricing

corridor  pricing

 

Mobility

Pricing

this is a really broad term that's used to refer to different things

Transit Fares

fuel costs

parking fees

car / bike share fees

road / bridge tolls

car insurance

ride-hailing / taxi fares

congestion pricing

User-Pays

Principle?

these terms refer to all the ways a user would pay to get around

This is a principle within Mobility Pricing that relates to how we pay/price. A user pays for how much they use the mobility network.

This can be applied through a blunt mechanism (e.g. 3 zone transit fares, annual insurance costs, fuel costs), or in ways where the price is more reflective of the use (e.g. distance-based insurance, transit fares, road usage charges).

Why do we price mobility?

- Pay for Operations + Maintenance

- Raise revenue

- Generate Profit (private sector)

- Manage the mobility system

Issues with Existing Pricing Principles

01

In recent years, we have separated how much we use from how much we pay. That is, our usage is not as reflective of the costs, as it once was.

For example, the fuel tax does not apply to electric vehicles, but these vehicles still add to congestion.

02

Often, current pricing is applied in ways that do not reflective how much a person uses.

BUS

$3

03

We currently do not pay for many indirect costs of mobility, like greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, congestion and overcrowding, noise, crashes, etc.

If we attempt to target things like congestion and pollution, then prices would need to vary by timing and location.

If the User-Pays principle was applied, pricing would be designed to target these indirect costs of mobility, and this would be implemented in ways described below.

Making sense of

The Systems

There are three types of Road Pricing systems:

Area / Cordon System

A fee is charged for driving into or within a defined boundary area. Sometimes, this is also referred to as a congestion charge.

You probably saw this in the news coverage about Vancouver's proposal. 

Corridor System

This system charges a set fee for using a road, bridge, or tunnel to pay for that piece of infrastructure.

The former tolling system on the Port Mann bridge is an example of this.

Network System

This system charges a fee for the use of roads over the entire mobility network, typically measured in terms of distance travelled.

 

(a brief history)

Metro Van

Mobility Pricing has been discussed many times over the previous decades and features in many regional plans. In some plans, it's been envisioned in a package of other pricing plans. 

1993

yeah, we've been talking about doing this for a while.

2017/18

2013

1993

2012

2011

Use the tool below to learn more. You can download all documents mentioned here in the Resources section.

2014/18

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(unpacking)

Vancouver

You've probably seen the new proposals from the City of Vancouver with the map of an outlined portion of the city centre along with the term 'mobility pricing' or 'transport pricing'. Let's clear some things up.

 

(super quick)

The Facts

01

Transport Pricing is NOT being implemented in Vancouver just yet.

02

A feasibility study will be undertaken and report back to Council in 2022.

03

City staff will consult with stakeholders, including residents, on the strategy.

04

Collaboration with regional and provincial partners will take place.

05

Protections will be put in place to protect vulnerable groups.

06

Vancouver uses the term 'Transport Pricing' to refer to a charge on vehicles.

(some details)

City Plans

2021

2022

2023

2025

City staff will develop a plan to engage the public in detail

An update with community feedback and more details will be provided to City Council

A transport pricing strategy will go to City Council for a final vote

If approved, transport pricing will be implemented

(from the City)

Reasons

The City wants to reduce traffic during congested times to make other modes of travel more reliable

They want to create more road space for transit and active transportation (i.e. walking + cycling)

They want the revenue from transport pricing to be invested in transit and walking + cycling to increase access

Vancouver is only going to get more crowded; they want to ensure that we can support the demand

They want to address pollution from vehicles and the contribution of GHG emissions from cars to climate change

 

(let's balance)

Goals + Concerns

Goals
Concerns
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(around the world)

Examples

Transport Pricing is not a made-in-BC concept. It is already in place in many places around the world, and we can learn from these examples.

 

Interactive

Map

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(more info)

Resources

Here are the resources we could get our hands on, including archives of our own work engaging the public on this issue back in 2013. We'll update this section as much as possible.

 

(browse through)

Collection

Documents

Videos

2013

Moving in Metro Summit

2018

SFU City Program

(current news)

Media

CBC 

News

"Mobility Pricing for Vancouver not going anywhere without more political support"

News 

1130

"Vancouver proposes mobility pricing for city streets"

Vancouver Is Awesome

"Mobility Pricing in Vancouver: Port Coquitlam, BC mayor says it's bad policy"

Business in Vancouver

"Mobility Pricing shouldn't be off the table, says TransLink CEO"

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(chime in)

Feedback

You're going to hear a lot from interested parties in the media about whether this is a good idea. No system is perfect, but our challenges aren't going to disappear and some solutions are better than others.

 

Let's hear

Your Views

How familiar are you with congestion pricing options?

1

Completely

Unfamiliar

Extremely

Familiar

Do you agree that a User Pays principle is an ideal way to price mobility?

Do you currently depend on a vehicle for daily activities?

The current transit funding model carries certain risks; you would prefer to:

What are your main concerns with congestion pricing?

Please ensure that you do not share any personally identifying or private information (including contact information) on this form. If you would like to contact us directly with questions or information you would like to share, please email cfd_mlr@sfu.ca. Your responses are collected anonymously and will be used for research purposes. These responses may also be shared publicly, with MLR stakeholders, and/or other partners.

How much of your monthly income is currently spent on mobility?

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

If congestion pricing were to be implemented in Metro Vancouver, how would you like to see the funds allocated?

Pick as many options as you'd like

I would like to see...

Would you be interested in learning more and joining regional dialogues on congestion pricing?

What are your other thoughts or concerns with congestion pricing?

Please ensure that you do not share any personally identifying or private information (including contact information) on this form. If you would like to contact us directly with questions or information you would like to share, please email cfd_mlr@sfu.ca. Your responses are collected anonymously and will be used for research purposes. These responses may also be shared publicly, with MLR stakeholders, and/or other partners.

MOVING IN 

A LIVABLE

REGION

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